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Self-blame, shame, avoidance, and suicidal ideation in sexually abused adolescent girls : a longitudinal study [r-libre/1789]

Alix, Stéphanie; Cossette, Louise; Cyr, Mireille; Frappier, Jean-Yves; Caron, Pier-Olivier, & Hébert, Martine (2020). Self-blame, shame, avoidance, and suicidal ideation in sexually abused adolescent girls : a longitudinal study. Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, 29 (4), 432-447. https://doi.org/10.1080/10538712.2019.1678543

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  PDF - Alix_etal(2019)_JCSA.pdf
Content : Published Version
Restricted access till end- November 2020.
 
Item Type: Journal Articles
Refereed: Yes
Status: Published
Abstract: Depressive symptoms, posttraumatic stress disorder, and suicidal ideation are among the most prevalent problems associated with sexual abuse. Based on the Traumagenic dynamic of stigmatization model, the aim of this study was to investigate whether self-blame, shame, and maladaptive coping strategies predicted posttraumatic stress disorder, depressive symptoms, and suicidal ideation among sexually abused adolescent girls using a longitudinal design. A total of 100 adolescent girls completed a series of questionnaires at the initial visit at the intervention center (T1) and 6 months later (T2). Path analysis reveals shame at T1 predicted posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms at T2 whereas self-blame at T1 predicted depressive symptoms at T2. Furthermore, avoidance coping at T1 and depressive symptoms at T2 predicted suicidal ideation at T2 and accounted for 54% of the variance. These findings suggest that interventions designed for sexually abused adolescent girls should target shame, self-blame, and avoidance coping to foster recovery in this vulnerable population.
Official URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/DP5ZGJSEFIZZTUG...
Depositor: Caron, Pier-Olivier
Owner / Manager: Pier-Olivier Caron
Deposited: 18 Nov 2019 20:30
Last Modified: 28 May 2020 23:16

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